MINIMALISM IN PACIFIC HEIGHTS

MINIMALISM IN PACIFIC HEIGHTS


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Even though the owners of a Tudor-style home in San Francisco’s posh Pacific Heights neighborhood aren’t particularly Tudor-style people, they forgave the house’s traditional British exterior and what they call its “confused” interior because of a prized location near the famed Gold Coast (also known as the preferred stomping grounds for head honchos of the tech industry). The new kids on the block—she’s a dentist, he’s an investment banker, and they’re both dyed-in-the-wool minimalists—resorted to extreme measures to transform their fussy domain into an archetype of elegant simplicity.

After admiring the interiors of a nearby home—a stunning and stark composition byNicole Hollis—the homeowners hired the local designer, along with Matthew Mosey of SF-based Dumican Mosey Architects, to create a clean slate in the towering four-story dwelling. The monumental rehab spanned two years and gutted the interior to do away with what Hollis calls the home’s “contemporary nonsense”: Misguided remodels dating from the 1980s and ’90s yielded clashing staircases, low door clearances and small window openings, leaving the 6,000-square-foot home with a disorienting flow and a severe natural light deficiency. (A steeply sloped backyard and the grandiose, sun-eclipsing manses looming above the house didn’t help matters.) Pictured: The dining room’s gallery-like setting intensifies the aerodynamic form of David Weeks’ Sarus chandelier No. 428, and brings more definition to the black and white photographs on the mantel.

To read the full article from California Home + Design click here 

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posted March 12, 2014

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